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Archived Message:

Crash course (or quick answers) needed


 
AC Peter Hi! New to the board and to Active EBook. Just downloaded it and I will purchase it as soon as I know it will be able to handle a few things.

Being that all documents that Active uses are HTML based, is there a quick method to control printing (so that pages print properly)?

We will offer technical books with a unique advantage. That is, that sections will be summarized on a singe sheet. The intention is that the summary wil be able to print out for future reference.

Is there a format (width, etc.) that I can use to assure pages print?

If I get my chart pages into a picture format (jpeg,etc.) and just put that picture into the page, will it print with resonable resolution (assuming I make it at 150-250 dpi)?

Also, do most authors concern themselves with having their books print in a format that fits a page, or is the general concept to make the e-book display on the full screen?

Any help and/or comments would be appreciated.

Thanks!
Peter


Posted on: 9:21 pm on December 7, 2004
Storyman Do a Google for: tutorial CSS "print page"

You'll get loads of information on how to accomplish what you want.


Posted on: 12:42 am on December 8, 2004
AC Peter Thanks Storyman. I will dig through the million or so matches. But, in the meantime, I have tried a couple of other ways of diong this. Because only certain pages of my books are really intended to be printed out, for future reference, I tried cutting a pdf file, and then linking to the pdf from a page in the Active eBook. Works great.

Now, for my next problem.

I created an index page, then a page2. Linked page one to page two. I inserted a picture in page2 (I was working with MS Word 2000) Word created a subdirectory for page2 images, even though I linked to the image in the root directory.

Created the Active eBook, no image on page two. How come? Any help would be appreciated.

Also...  is the pdf file a good altrenative? I can encrypt it to stop printing, but can I stop the pdf ''save'' function from within Active eBook?

Thanks again!
Peter


Posted on: 12:52 am on December 8, 2004
Storyman The answer is in the question. You wrote, "...Word created a subdirectory..."

Sub directories are not allowed. Period. Move everything into the same directory and make sure the links are correct.

A PDF file requires the user to have Adobe's Acrobat installed. Whenever possible I avoid the user to have to do install anything. As an aside, I once posted a PDF file for a class of university graduate students to download. You'd think in this day and age that wouldn't be a problem.  Guess what--a few were confused as to what to do with a PDF file.

CSS is a much better way to go IMHO.

(Edited by Storyman at 8:08 pm on Dec. 7, 2004)


Posted on: 4:06 am on December 8, 2004
Alaska Peter -

 Your ebook printed output should look just fine, as long as it displays correctly onscreen.

 Sometimes, web pages lose the right-hand edge of text if they're contained in tables of an absolute size.

 If you're not using tables, you shouldn't have any problems.  

 If you want it to look different from your online view, you will need to specify the change in formatting with a print stylesheet (it's a regular stylesheet call, but with a additional property: media='print').

 As far as printing images goes, you'll want to save any image that uses less than 256 colors as a .gif file.  Use .jpgs for those nature and people photos.  Save your .gif file at the same resolution you use onscreen.  

 The dpi becomes irrelevant with web graphics; that's a printer resolution.  Most folks have at least 300 dpi with their laser printers or inkjets, so the real issue is to make them display correctly onscreen.

 It's the dimensions in pixels that you want to pay attention to, and adjust.  Capture the charts at the actual pixel size you want; resizing inevitably loses some of image detail.

 When all else fails, you could just try printing out a page, and see how it looks.  I suspect it won't be much of an issue for you...

best -


Posted on: 6:40 pm on December 9, 2004
AC Peter Gentlemen,
Thank you for all of your help. Unfortunately, I have to make an admission here... I am not real familiar with CSS. (Please...don't banish me from the board!) Just that I am writing technical information, so telling other people what to do or not to do can be a job in itself (and writing is not my full time occupation - yet). Then all the HTML stuff that you need to learn and do, you know there are only 24 hours in a day! ... and I already work 26!

I happen to be working with tables and have tested a bunch of pages. At this time, everything seems to be working ok.

Once again, I thank you for your help. Appreciate it very much.

By the way, other than creating a password, does Active dBook provide any other method of protection if I want to distribute eBooks on a CD? Just wondering.

Peter


Posted on: 4:42 am on December 10, 2004

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